Trekking in Bhutan is unlike anywhere else in Himalayas. The walks are long and arduous but they are complemented by crystal air and views that defy description. Only a handful tourist trek each year and paths and communications may not be as developed as there are in other Himalayas destinations, However, what Bhutan may lack in infrastructure development it makes up through its superb facilities for trekkers. All parties are accompanied by a trained guide, a cook, an assistant and at least one horseman. Horses and yaks carry all provisions and most belongings; trekkers rarely have to carry more than a day pack with camera and extra film. The support crew walks ahead of the trekking party each day and pitch camp before the trekkers arrive. A warm cup of tea waiting in the dinning tent is most welcome treat after hour of walking up and down mountains as high as 18,000 feet. Altitude sickness is an acute problem for trekkers in Bhutan. Almost all of the designated treks go above 3,000 meters (9,000ft). Walkers who have not properly acclimatized or those who suffer from altitude sickness are advised not to trek. If you are used to high altitudes it’s a good idea to start slowly and allow yourself to acclimatize. Trekking permits are required for all parties. Treks vary from short three-day walks across relatively low altitudes to the three-week Snowman Trek that covers 356 kilometers and climbs three of the Kingdoms highest passes. Inexperienced trekkers are recommended to trek from Thimphu to Paro or vice-versa called the “Druk Path”. It leads across the chain of mountains separating the two valleys passing crystal clear lakes and offering splendid views of the high Himalayas outside the monsoon season. More difficult treks take in northern villages and pass yak herdsmen who spend most of the year tending to their herds high about the villages. The northern path-climb as high as 5,500 meters and should only be attempted by strong experienced walkers.

Trekking Programs